Halley VI Research Station

This competition entry for a new Antarctic Research Station proposes a steel and fabric structure that provided efficient, adaptable, well serviced space for scientific research and comfortable accommodation in one of the Earth’s most inhospitable climates.

 

 

Client: British Antarctic Survey

Location: Antarctic

Status: Shortlisted competition entry 2006

Services Engineer: Buro Happold

Structural Engineer: Buro Happold

Images: Smoothe

Halley VI Research Station

This competition entry for a new Antarctic Research Station proposes a steel and fabric structure that provided efficient, adaptable, well serviced space for scientific research and comfortable accommodation in one of the Earth’s most inhospitable climates.

The layout consists of three two-storey craft, each supported on eight separately jackable legs, with generously-proportioned interiors defined by specially-fabricated walls of integral furniture. These can be reconfigured as required to create a technical environment for scientific research or a welcoming, low-maintenance home that enhances the crew’s wellbeing.

The substructure is a space-grid of steel trusses within which are located the servicing systems. The envelope of the upper deck is composed of two layers with the body of air trapped between providing added insulation, reducing air infiltration and so significantly reducing energy consumption. Structure, services, and fit out have all been designed to provide an easily-maintainable and adaptable environment that provides the conditions required for the scientific research operations.

Three entries were chosen by the British Antarctic Survey, with Hugh Broughton’s winning design eventually being built on the site.

 

 

 

Client: British Antarctic Survey

Location: Antarctic

Status: Shortlisted competition entry 2006

Services Engineer: Buro Happold

Structural Engineer: Buro Happold

Images: Smoothe


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